Friday, November 30, 2012

Titanic at Night



I thought it would be fun to do some art activities that took place at night.  Working on black paper gives different effects but we don't do it very often.

I took this coloring page at Kids-n-fun and redrew a simplified version on to black paper.

Titanic at Night

I cut a sponge into a star shape and glued it on to a cork.  Keeping my Toddler entertained did a blog post about her button stamps that gave me the idea for this.

Then I gave younger Toad his paint which included iridescent medium.  It's the best thing ever because it makes all your paint shimmery.  The boys went through a phase where they refused to paint without it.  The picture above is his interpretation of the project.  He had colored pencils and a paint brush too.

For older Toad, I took one of his premade books and glued black paper to the front.  On the back I glued his ticket from the exhibition.  I talked about the exhibition in my first Titanic activities post here.  I gave him our box of Prismacolors and asked him to do a drawing of the Titanic hitting the iceberg.  I said the project as a whole was to describe his experiences the night the Titanic sank from the perspective of Nils  Odahl.  Mr. Odahl is the passenger that he was assigned for the exhibition.  Then he chose to fill one whole side of the book with a drawing of the Titanic with its lifeboats being lowered.



On the other side he wrote his story.  It said:
The night was quiet.  Suddenly the Titanic crashed into an iceberg.  Just before the Titanic sank it split in two.  The bow sank right away.  The stern bobbed for a few seconds then sank.  The Titanic was gone.  Survivors huddled in lifeboats.  Around 3:30 AM a signal rocket streaked the sky.  Mr. Nils sank in the disaster.

  
To focus on the good things about this story - Older Toad's handwriting is soooo much better.  It's great that it's legible.  His spelling is awesome.  Now I have to interject as the nitpicky teacher and detective of all things curriculum.  We've been using All About Spelling as our spelling curriculum.  I've been really pleased with it and have continued to use the lessons in order thinking learning each spelling rule would give him a good foundation.  Which after doing this story I think I need to reevaluate.  Toad's become a cautious speller.  He wants to confirm every letter before he commits it to paper.  If you press him he will spell every word orally fine.  I think I'm stifling his writing by focusing on the handwriting and spelling.  

During this story I told him he spells great and needs to be more confident and just write it down.  I told him I'd help him with his spelling after he was done but I'm sure he'd spell everything right.  Starting with ...Survivors and ending with..sky, rather than try and spell he got out one of the Titanic books we've been reading to confirm the spelling of the words since I said I wasn't helping him until the end.  Coincidentally, those two sentences in his story sure sounded exactly like the ones in the book.  When we read his story together at the end, we had a talk about what plagiarism is and why it's bad.

Moving forward on our creative writing journey I think I need to jump ahead in the All About Spelling curriculum so he's being pushed more.  If he's being pushed he'll make some mistakes and correct them, and see it's all okay and part of learning. I'm also going to get the Grammar Island curriculum from Royal Fireworks Press.  I've heard good things about it and I think focusing on aspects of writing more than mechanics at this time would give him more opportunities for creativity.  I'm hoping it'll help him see his story as a large work of art rather than focusing on the minutia of each letter.



 
 
 
Iridescent Medium 2.5 oz. Iridescent Medium 2.5 oz.
When mixed with watercolor, this medium gives an iridescent, glittery effect.



Premier Colored Pencil Sets set of 36
Premier Colored Pencil Sets set of 36
These soft, thick lead pencils have been enhanced with a better bonding process, providing professional, artist quality color while resisting breakage. They provide high blendability, excellent lightfastness, and a smooth laydown that will not scratch.Unmatched in brilliance, Prismacolor Premier Colored Pencils are perfect for illustration, renderings, landscape, and portraiture. The pencils are non-toxic, AP certified, and do not contain rainforest wood.

6 comments:

Stef Layton said...

interesting thoughts about AAS - we've used it for 3 years.

We-Made-That.com said...

I just love all your projects! Love the pictures, and the story your son wrote. And I am sure he will learn that it does not have to be perfect. Thanks for sharing on We Made That!

maggy, red ted art said...

Wonderful project.

Thanks for sharing on Kids Get Crafty!

Maggy

Savannah McQueen said...

Thanks for linking up with Its a Wrap. I'll be pinning this to my history board.

Carrie said...

What wonderful lessons and I love the paintings and artwork! Thank you for sharing at Sharing Saturday!!

Christy said...

Very cool. Thanks for linking up to tip-toe thru tuesday.

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